Friday, March 13, 2020

Oaky Essays

Oaky Essays Oaky Essay Oaky Essay He was a silly man and he came from a silly town. On this day he encountered a box of Emeralds, but unknown to him they were Blood Emeralds! Okay, not knowing this tidbit ended up spending the Emeralds everywhere until one day he is arrested by the villager police for using these emeralds. In prison he got to meet all sorts of new people and even got a prison tattoo! In memory of his mother; this tattoo was put on him by warden, Jeremiah Bullfrog; He liked to tattoo the newbies. The tattoo looked like a cross between a pentagram, the number 37, a pigeon on fire and the Black Mesa symbol. This shape looked Just like his first macaroni art that his mom throw away, and now he lives happily ever after with a swarm of prison batches Or so we thought. To be continued After fifty-five years of being in prison okay decided to set out on an epic adventure to seek the great prophet Infinitum; Okay wanted to see if she had any idea who the real thief who stole those emeralds so long ago was. Okay decided at iris to head back to his home town went © to see if anybody he knew was still alive. As it was about a 5 day walk from Berrylike to his home he had to stop by the local trading post for some supplies. At the trading post Okay noticed that all the people looked sad he asked a young girl that worked at the trading post named Mafias why everyone looked so down. Mafias told him that their great Fuehrer Alarm raised the tax once again, now no one was able to buy the goods that they needed. This was a big problem for okay as he had little money to begin with.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Music Report Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Music Report - Essay Example She did a solo piece on her violin which she has been playing for the last three years. Being a student of Dr Rife, and considering that her instructor was present, she had to give a good account of herself. She started out on a pianissimo and the audience held their breath. The performance was quite amazing and by the time she hit the crescendo, the hall was in uproar. She played out the long notes beautifully. However, the student encountered one problem: nervousness. Maybe it was the presence of her instructor, Dr Rife, or the overwhelming audience. The burden of expectation clearly weighed down on her. Nevertheless, she was able to gather courage and improved her performance as the evening wore on. Then came Dr Rife and the Rhythm Kings Band. The band brought together great talents, including Dan Tobias on the trumpet, Pete Reichlin on the trombone, Pat Mercuri on the banjo and guitar and Lenny Pucciatti who was working the drums. Dr Jerry Rife played the clarinet. The various instruments combined powerfully to get the audience on their feet. The accompaniments balanced well with the vocals, especially in the band’s rendition of the spiritual, Down by the Riverside. The performance of the spiritual resonated well with the audience although the band gave it a feeling of jazz. This was something new, listening to hymn played in the jazz style. I loved this version of the hymn as it injected freshness into an otherwise drab song. The performance had its downside nonetheless. There were moments when the percussions were louder than the vocals. Consequently, it was not easy to make out the lyrics of the songs. There were also moments when the crescendos were so high that they were almost deafening. I generally dislike high notes as they interfere with my brain. I also dislike accompaniments that shroud vocals. I prefer music that is cool enough to allow even a conversation to take place. The audience thoroughly enjoyed the performances. They

Sunday, February 9, 2020

Underwater Communication Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Underwater Communication - Essay Example Underwater Communication The paper is aimed to present the different methods and forms of underwater communication.To communicate with the surface, the diver uses tools such as MK 12 SSDS, the MK 21 MOD 1, or the MK 20 MOD 0, both voice communications and line-pull signals. The voice communication is the primary means and the line-pull signals are used secondary tools of communication. For diver-to-diver communication, topside intercom, diver-to-diver hand signals, and slate boards are used (Dietrich, 1999, 6-19). The diver intercommunication systems are composed of diver’s earphones, microphone, the communication cable for each diver, the surface control unit, and the tender’s speaker and microphone. These systems allow the communication from the control station to a maximum of three divers. With voice correction circuitry feature, the system is the primary choice for tasks and activities that involve the need to communicate underwater. Another way of communication used by the divers is the li ne-pull signalling which is commonly a distinct pull or a series of sharp pulls on the line from the top to the diver. The said form of communication is based on the needs of the group and the objective of the activity, thus, most signals are established prior to the implementation (Dietrich, 1999, 6-19). Another type of underwater communication is the underwater acoustic communication. The technology works through underwater acoustic channels and is classified on the basis of the methods for compensating effects of multipath and phase variations. The underwater acoustic communication systems are divided into incoherent and coherent detection systems. The example of incoherent systems is the DATS or digital acoustic telemetry. Coherent digital receiver systems make use of specifically localized components to be able to achieve high data rates in the presence of ISI or intersymbol interference which usually affect the quality of communication. This is achieved through the use of special signal processing techniques to compensate other factors such as ISI. There are numerous methods employed and combined for application on goal-specific needs for underwater activities that require the acoustic communication techniques (Klemm, 2004, p.832). The application of underwater acoustic communic ation includes diving, underwater navigation in different types of vehicles and vessels, and even marine animals such as mammals. The underwater communication in mammals is similar to any other technology in underwater communication since there is a sender and a receiver of information. There are two types of underwater communication methods in mammals, one is that of a single sender and multiple receivers who reacts to the message and another is a complex exchange of information among different individuals. Common examples of the animals that utilize the method of underwater acoustic communication are dolphins and certain kinds of seals that use sonar for communication, navigation and hunting food (McGregor, 2005, 390). This method is also used by underwater vessels for navigation and exploration specifically in the deep waters. Sonar is a common means of communication in vessels. In the advent of technology though, other forms communication networks are established and used (Dietr ich, 1999). These forms of communication are included in the next classification. Wireless Underwater Communication Systems Wireless underwater commun

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Issues in Scottish Curriculum Design Essay Example for Free

Issues in Scottish Curriculum Design Essay The way that any curricula is broken up into is two main ways; one being the curriculum in action, where the aims, content and experiences of the curriculum on paper are implemented in practice. The other is the curriculum on paper which is the ideology of what should be implemented in education across the board. The ideology in curriculum can be split up into four main categories. Most papers on this topic, agree to an extent what the four ideologies constitute of, but Schiro’s (2008) ideologies are the most commonly known. The ‘Scholar Academic’, the ‘Social Efficiency’, the ‘Learner Centred’ and the ‘Social Reconstruction’ ideologies are the four main categories explained in the Curriculum Theory that will be discussed in this paper in relation to The Curriculum for Excellence, the current curriculum in Scotland. The oldest of the four ideologies is the Scholar Academic ideology which focuses on the accumulation of knowledge and understanding. The aim of this ideology is to pass on the knowledge of certain disciplines (subject areas), to allow there to be future scholars in that particular area and therefore, further develop understanding. The academic disciplines are the result of the culture’s compiled knowledge and understanding of each area, and with this in mind, the purpose of education is to assist pupils to learn this knowledge. The next ideology is Social Efficiency. This is pretty dominant in our curriculum today and means to prepare the learner for becoming an efficient and contributing member in society. The learner’s objective is to learn certain skills that will in turn achieve certain objectives that benefit society (Lorrie A. 2000). The individual will learn a mixture of knowledge and skills that can be put together, therefore making the skills more efficient and more beneficial to society. The learner centred ideology focuses more on the needs and interests of the individual rather than the c ontent they are to learn. The idea behind this theory is that learning will take place due to the interactions between the individual and their environment, therefore being more down to the experiences rather than the content. The newest of these ideologies is Social Reconstruction. This is where the social reconstructionists are aware of the problems in society and see the job of the educator to correct these problems in the classroom, hoping that it will reconstruct their society as it is (Groenke, S. 2009). The focus of the curriculum would not be based on knowledge but more of values and opinions that would benefit the society and make it attain the greatest satisfaction of its members. In ‘Building the Curriculum 3: A framework for learning and teaching’ it has examples of all four of the classifications of the curriculum ideology provided by Schiro (2008). It has examples of Academic ideology as it discusses the importance of knowledge and the ability and opportunity to increase the depth of knowledge already acquired as it states â€Å"Throughout a young person’s learning there will be increasing specialisation and greater depth, which will lead to subjects increasingly being the principal means of structuring learning and delivering outcomes.† (page 20, Building the Curriculum 3). From this quote we can relate the academic ideology through the concentration on developing knowledge further to specialisation in certain subjects, therefore being able to pass on the knowledge and allow it to grow from there. There are many examples of ‘The Social Efficiency Ideology’ in the paper as it focuses on health and wellbeing experiences and outcomes where the individual’s get the opportunity to gain skills that benefit the individual in life and work, but also the community around them. This is to help them become effective contributors in society: †¦support all children and young people in developing skills which they will use throughout their life and in their work, including the development of pre-vocational, enterprise and employability skills, personal skills, high levels of cognitive skills and the opportunity to put learning into a practical context. (page 15, Building the Curriculum 3) This example shows that the curriculum is aiming to encourage the learning of certain skills that will improve chances of employability and life skills that will help the young people settle into society and be able to play their part within it. The Curriculum for Excellence sees itself as being centred on the learner, and their individual needs. There are plenty examples throughout the paper of this ideology where the child is involved in what they are learning and setting themselves goals to achieve and having choice in what they learn within the curriculum, â€Å"All children and young people should experience personalisation and choice within their curriculum, including identifying and planning for opportunities for personal achievement in a range of different contexts† (page 17, Building the Curriculum 3). This quote shows that the idea of the curriculum is to give young people freedom to make their own decisions in what they are learning and at their own level. There are four capacities that make up the purpose of the curriculum that are described in this paper. ‘Successful learners’, ‘confident individuals’, ‘responsible citizens’ and ‘effective contributors’, are the capacities that the curriculum aims to enable young people to become. ‘Responsible citizens’ is a good example of The Social Reconstructive ideology as it explains how they will learn respect and about different cultures and how to behave responsibly within the community in all aspects (political, cultural or otherwise). As Building the curriculum states: †¦able to develop knowledge and understanding of the world and Scotland’s place in it, understand different beliefs and cultures make informed choices and decisions evaluate environmental, scientific and technological issues develop informed, ethical views of complex. (page 22, Building the Curriculum 3) Here in this example, it shows that the curriculum wants to provide young people with varied knowledge so that the decisions they make in the future will help to create a better society. The idea is to teach them about values and respect so that they may make better informed decisions as to what is best for the society around them. Building the Curriculum 3 contains examples of all four of the ideology categories, but there are two that are most prevalent, ‘Learner Centred’ and ‘Social Efficiency’. Upon examining the evidence in more depth it seems that the ‘Social Efficiency’ ideology is the most dominant within this paper. Its main focus is on preparing and equipping individuals for future endeavours. For instance, the skills needed for future work prospects upon which Kridel’s (ed.2010) summary, of David Sneddon’s idea of social efficiency, explains the curriculum as a way to make individuals efficient for work. As discussed by Arnoldy (online), social efficiency in education is more for the benefit of the social economy than for the individual, but contradicting that theory in this paper, are the examples of learner centred ideology that is dotted throughout. Though, combining these two theories, Valades’ (online) talks about the idea that to help out society, educating young people to learn and improve their skills and capabilities to help the community in the future, is the way forward. From Building the Curriculum 3 and having summarised that the main ideology behind it is focusing on preparing the individuals to become more efficient and productive for contributing to our society, we can see that there will be some implication for teachers. Teachers who have been teaching for years under the same curriculum will struggle to accept the new curriculum, if it is as completely different way to how they have been teaching before. Although the main focus of the curriculum in Scotland has been focused on preparing individuals for the future, it has not been focused on the more individual level. This may cause implication for teachers as they only have specific allocated times to be with classes and it will be hard to offer each individual, the time and attention they need to develop specific skills to the point of being efficient. The teacher will have to focus more on the experiences and outcomes the learners are objected to, to develop the skills needed for the real world. This causes some problems as it depends highly on what the school can afford to give in ways of experiences, as most of these will probably be met outside of school. So, teachers need to find a way of achieving the outcome of making the individual a more effective contributor to society by combining what they learn in and outside of the classroom. This would be a task for teachers, as the environment each individual they teach will be different and this therefore means that the teacher will have to find a way to combine these different environments or find a similarity and focus on that. Building the Curriculum 3 has some implication for teachers, but the focus being on social efficiency means that in some ways there are not so many changes from the past as at least for the last hundred years the school curriculum has been focused on making learners that will have skills that will help them achieve objectives that will make the society a more efficient place. A Comparative Overview of the Curriculum Ideologies Chapter 6 http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/47671_ch_6.pdf (visited 29th dec 2012) Critical Pedagogy and Teacher Education in the Neoliberal Era: Small Openings pp 3 Springer Netherlands, 2009 volume 6 Susan L. Groenke http://www.geocities.ws/rf_valades/index2.htm Social Efficiency Theory SAVE SOMETHING TODAY Rodrigo Valades visited 29th dec 2012 The Role of Assessment in a Learning Culture Lorrie A. Shepard Vol. 29, No. 7 (Oct., 2000), pp. 4 American Educational Research Association http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/47671_ch_6.pdf Chapter 6 A Comparative Overview of the Curriculum Ideologies visited 29th dec 2012 Encyclopedia of Curriculum Studies edited by Craig Kridel SAGE Publications Inc 2010 Pg 4-7 Curriculum Theory: Conflicting Visions and Enduring Concerns, Schiro, M. (2008a) SAGE Publications, Inc Pg 199-245 Curriculum Theory: Conflicting Visions and Enduring Concerns Second Edition, Schiro, M. (2012b) SAGE Publications, Inc Building the Curriculum 3: A framework for learning and teaching, The Scottish Government, 2008

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

The Apprenticeship of duddy Kravitz :: essays research papers

  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In society, most people have an obsession to some extent, these may include such things as a hobby – collecting antiques; or even as simple as having to have things a certain way. For others though, obsession has a different meaning, they might become obsessed with one special object, or possibly attaining a certain goal. They might go about achieving this goal no matter what the consequences to others might be. Mordecai Richler’s book the Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, illustrates one such case of obsession, the title character, Duddy Kravitz becomes obsessed with his grandfather’s saying, â€Å" ‘ A man without land, is nothing.’†, thus starting Duddy on his quest to attain a piece of land. Throughout his quest, Duddy has no regard for the feelings or the relationships he destroys in the process, weather it in his family relations, business relations, or even his personal relations to those that are closest to him.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Duddy was not born into money, his father, Max, was a taxi driver, and pulled in a low income. Max’s brother, Benjy had money and always played favourites with Duddy’s brother, Lennie by giving him money and opportunities. Duddy always had to struggle for his money, and in one his many struggles he borrows his father’s taxi cab, which is his only source of income, but does not return it for three days. He was delivering pin ball machines that he had sold. When he returns he finds his father is furious at him just taking off with the cab without permission. â€Å"They found Max at Eddy’s, and he was furious, ‘who do you think you are?,’ he said ‘that you can run off with my car for three days? Just like that.’† (Richler, 213). Duddy has a way of burning bridges with the people that he most needs, he only thinks of himself, and has no consideration for the feelings of others, even those who does not want t o hurt the most. Duddy’s grandfather, also known as the Zeyda, is Duddy’s mentor and the only person Duddy really looks up to, and the one he does not want to hurt, but ends up hurting him the worst. â€Å"‘Yvette came to see me.’†¦. ’she told me what you did,’ Simcha said, ‘And I don’t want a farm here.’ †¦. ‘I can see what you have planned for me, Duddel. You’ll be good to me. You’d give me everything I wanted. The Apprenticeship of duddy Kravitz :: essays research papers   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In society, most people have an obsession to some extent, these may include such things as a hobby – collecting antiques; or even as simple as having to have things a certain way. For others though, obsession has a different meaning, they might become obsessed with one special object, or possibly attaining a certain goal. They might go about achieving this goal no matter what the consequences to others might be. Mordecai Richler’s book the Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, illustrates one such case of obsession, the title character, Duddy Kravitz becomes obsessed with his grandfather’s saying, â€Å" ‘ A man without land, is nothing.’†, thus starting Duddy on his quest to attain a piece of land. Throughout his quest, Duddy has no regard for the feelings or the relationships he destroys in the process, weather it in his family relations, business relations, or even his personal relations to those that are closest to him.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Duddy was not born into money, his father, Max, was a taxi driver, and pulled in a low income. Max’s brother, Benjy had money and always played favourites with Duddy’s brother, Lennie by giving him money and opportunities. Duddy always had to struggle for his money, and in one his many struggles he borrows his father’s taxi cab, which is his only source of income, but does not return it for three days. He was delivering pin ball machines that he had sold. When he returns he finds his father is furious at him just taking off with the cab without permission. â€Å"They found Max at Eddy’s, and he was furious, ‘who do you think you are?,’ he said ‘that you can run off with my car for three days? Just like that.’† (Richler, 213). Duddy has a way of burning bridges with the people that he most needs, he only thinks of himself, and has no consideration for the feelings of others, even those who does not want t o hurt the most. Duddy’s grandfather, also known as the Zeyda, is Duddy’s mentor and the only person Duddy really looks up to, and the one he does not want to hurt, but ends up hurting him the worst. â€Å"‘Yvette came to see me.’†¦. ’she told me what you did,’ Simcha said, ‘And I don’t want a farm here.’ †¦. ‘I can see what you have planned for me, Duddel. You’ll be good to me. You’d give me everything I wanted.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Lifeboat Ethics Essay

Life is like a cruise ship†¦ or at least until the engine blows up and your oasis of luxury sinks. Before you know it, you find yourself sitting in one of the few lifeboats, surrounded by hundreds of people who are now accurately portraying survival of the fittest. They are treading water and fearing sharks, all because there are not enough rafts. You are grateful to be in your lifeboat and eventually question if everyone on this earth has an equal right to an equal share in its resources (Hardin 1). Well, if you were not wondering about that, Garrett Hardin was. In his essay â€Å"Lifeboat Ethics: the Case Against Helping the Poor†, Hardin compares the condition of wealthy nations to that of a lifeboat. Hardin’s main idea is that wealthy nations should not offer any kind of assistance or support to people in poor countries because the outcome in doing so would be a catastrophe. Although Hardin’s ideas accurately state the problems of over-population and supporting the poor, he fails to defend his logic by not stating a satisfying compromise between the two extremes of giving all of our resources to the poor and not helping the poor at all. He uses a lifeboat example to show the segregation to show the segregation of the rich people in the boat and the poor people swimming in the surrounding water. Natural instinct is to take in as many poor people as possible even if the raft lacks space, but Hardin argues that the result would be a sinking raft and a disaster. There would be no positive result. If rich people pull poor people in the raft, the raft would then lose its â€Å"safety factor†. In the end, there would be no positive outcome in helping the swimmers and the result would be â€Å"complete justice, complete catastrophe† (Hardin 1). â€Å"In a crowded world of less than perfect human beings, mutual ruin is inevitable if there are no controls. This is the tragedy of the commons† (Hardin 3). The tragedy of the commons is a perfect example as to why there is no advantage in helping the poor. A person’s property or possession is well taken care of because it is his or her own responsibility. But if it is available for everyone it would not be taken care of as much. Hardin uses air and water as examples of commons that have been taken advantage of. Since air and water are both treated as commons, they have become polluted and therefore endanger everyone. Another negative product of helping the poor is that they will never learn from their mistakes. Since poor countries know that the wealthy countries will be there to help and give them aide when needed, they will never learn to save themselves and prepare for future disasters. Why would they? No one would go out of their way to get something if they knew it would be handed to them when needed. â€Å"But they can learn from experience. They may mend their ways, and learn to budget for infrequent but certain emergencies† (Hardin 4). Hardin does not give a neutral idea to this problem. He basically states, either we give the poor everything or we give them nothing at all. This problem could easily be solved by limiting how much we give other countries in their times of need. If they are aware that they will only get x-amount of supplies from us, they will be more likely to stock necessities and other resources. Hardin’s argument is whether we should help poor countries and have them forever depend on us, or not help them and let them learn their lesson in the hopes that it will benefit them in the future. It is understandable that we should help them because we are a rich nation and should not be greedy with our wealth, but people are naturally careless and selfish when tragedy strikes. When people receive aide, they end up depending on it as long as they can. So the answer to the question asked earlier is no, not everyone is entitled to a fair share of resources. â€Å"For the foreseeable future, our survival demands that we govern our action by the ethics of a lifeboat, harsh as though they may be. Posterity will be satisfied with nothing less† (Hardin 8).

Monday, January 6, 2020

A Look at Crime from a Sociological Perspective - 1020 Words

Crime A Look into Crime from a Sociological Perspective Introduction Crime is considered to be some breech or violation of behaviors which stand in opposition of rules or norms instituted by some governing body. Some actions are considered to be crimes throughout most societies in history; murder or physical abuse can serve as an example as an example. However, the majorities of things that are considered crimes are more of a subjective nature and vary widely in different societies. In many societies it is a crime to be an atheist or to be homosexual for example, while in other societies these items are tolerated and in some cases are considered social norms. Furthermore, when an individual is considered to have committed a crime, the punishments for these crimes also can vary widely depending on the culture, the social norms, the position of the authority figure, as well as a plethora of other factors. This paper will analyze some of the different forms of crime and they develop and how they are treated in different societies. Variations in Crime Crimes are events that are mandated by the criminal law system of a particular nation or any size of population group. The way in which these laws come about has various manifestations around the globe. Some are based on religious norms or teaching while in other areas they are based on political ideology. For example, bigamy, a man who claims more than one wife, is a criminal in most Western nations. However, in mostShow MoreRelatedThe Sociological Imagination and Understanding Personal Troubles as Social Issues1259 Words   |  6 PagesThe Sociological Imagination and understanding personal troubles as social issues: The Sociological Imagination allows us to question â€Å"things† or issues which are common and familiar to us and to find its deeper meaning. 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